Posts Tagged With: The Egyptian Museum

Grand Egyptian Museum final phase construction to begin

The Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM) in Egypt has received a grant of LE300 million ($50.4 million) loan from the Japanese Government for completion of the final phase.

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GEM is designed to provide an Egyptology centre of excellence for the next 100 years and will be sited near the pyramids of Giza. Arup is working on the design of the museum as part of a joint venture after winning an international architectural competition.

The museum will occupy a 50-acre site and will feature a translucent stone wall that will be 800m long. The wall will rise to 40m, allowing visitors to explore the sheltered space. Illuminated by the dramatic lighting schemes of the main building, the wall will add night-time drama to the desert landscape.

The main building will house the museum and a conference centre, connected by a large shaded courtyard and a exhibition space with 800-seat auditorium. The new building will house a restaurant, ticketing facilities and other services. On a separate part of the site, the conservation and energy centre will house special laboratories for cleaning, cataloguing and restoring artefacts.

The statue of King Tut would be the main attraction, including a number of artifacts from the Egyptian Museum that will be transferred to the GEM once the development is completed. Soft landscaping will provide outdoor leisure areas with internal circulation and access roads winding between them.

The museum will feature 100,000 artifacts with the government to spend $100 million on storage rooms and a renovation center for the GEM. Construction work would begin in mid-November 2011 and is scheduled to be completed by March 2015.

Source:http://www.worldinteriordesignnetwork.com

Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955.

Posted By Mohamed Mokhtar

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Categories: Archaeology, Cairo Info, current events in egypt, Egypt after the revolution, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Egypt Travel | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

My visit to the Grand Egyptian Museum

My visit to the Grand Egyptian Museum

I went to the Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM) at Giza on Tuesday to review the progress being made there. It was a very successful trip. I have always dreamed of this museum being Egypt’s answer to New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the best and biggest museum in the world. I saw that its staff are working hard to realize this dream and that it is a successful example of international cooperation.

In 2002 we held an international architecture competition with UNESCO and the International Union of Architects to choose the winning design for the GEM. This new museum was planned from the start to be the biggest museum of Egyptology in the world. Architects from 83 different countries entered the competition with 1557 designs. 20 were short-listed by the committee, but Heneghan Peng Architects from Ireland were unanimously chosen as the winner in July 2003. Joining them is an international team of 300 engineers representing Egypt, Ireland, the UK, the Netherlands, Austria and Canada.

Building work started in May 2005, concentrating first on a new conservation center, conservation energy center, fire station and an artifact tunnel to allow safe transfer of objects from the conservation center and the main body of the museum. The buildings are 10m below street level for security reasons and to cause the minimum impact on the view of the surrounding desert landscape. In July 2008 work started on the main museum building and museum site. These too have been carefully designed to not be any higher than the Giza plateau, allowing an uninterrupted view of the pyramids. Achieving this involved moving 2.25 million cubic meters of sand, which took 7 months of continuous work!

On Tuesday I listened to presentations given by senior staff members on the state of work. Everything is going well. After the interruption caused by the Revolution, everything is progressing again as planned. I then toured the facilities at the conservation center. They are secure, climate controlled and contain state of the art equipment. I watched the conservators and researchers conserving and studying a number of artifacts, and was very impressed by the young Egyptians there. I spoke to some of them and feel positive that the Museum is drawing on the best talent from here and abroad. I also visited the artifact stores and was pleased to see so many beautiful objects in safe storage ready for future display.

When this amazing project is finished, the Grand Egyptian Museum will be a true gem with its large galleries; study and education center; library; children’s museum and school; recreational areas and play parks; 3D cinema; theatre; arts and craft workshops for adults and children; shops and cafes. The Tutankhamun displays will comprise 30% of the gallery space, around five times as much as can currently be dedicated to them in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. His famous mask will be a final highlight of the visitors’ trip.

I also had a meeting with the directors of what will be the three biggest museums in Egypt; the Egyptian Museum, the GEM and the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization (NMEC). During this meeting, we discussed various issues, including their future cooperation, the importance of allocating unique artifacts fairly between them all, the benefit of having a shared database and joint training of curators. It is my hope that the GEM and the NMEC will be independent with their own museum boards for administrative matters.

Afterwards, I was speaking to members of the press and I made several important announcements, including that we will celebrate the opening of the GEM in March 2015. We will soon be moving the solar boat of Khufu from its current location in a small museum next to the Great Pyramid of Giza to a new, special museum next to the GEM too. A tender for this job will be put out later this month. I also announced that the sales of two statues stolen from Kom el-Khamsin are being investigated, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be returning some artifacts from Tutankhamun’s tomb and my efforts to repatriate the bust of Nefertiti from Berlin will be renewed again very soon.

Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955.

Source: http://www.drhawass.com

Posted By: Mohamed Mokhtar

Categories: Archaeology, Cairo Info, current events in egypt, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Events In Egypt, Museums, The Egyptian Museum | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Visiting the NMEC

Visiting the NMEC

Last week I made a visit to a new museum we are building in Cairo, the National Museum of Civilization (NMEC). It is located in Old Cairo, and will be an important world-class museum when it is finished.

Dr. Hawass views the roof of the NMEC located in Fustat. (Photo: Jennifer Willoughby)

The construction of this museum will be finished by mid-June 2011, and when the structure is complete we will work on the interior, which will take about a year and a half. We are working on a very limited budget now, but we hope that tourism will increase in Egypt soon and we will be able to push the building project forward and get back on schedule to finish this great museum.

The purpose of this museum is to provide a comprehensive picture of the story of Egypt’s history from the prehistoric period up to the 25th of January revolution this year. A civilization museum such as this does not rely upon masterpieces, instead the focus is on the story. The star of this museum will be the royal mummies, which will be shown for the first time within the context of their whole history, including details about their reign as well as information about the CT scans and DNA studies of family relationships.

Dr. Hawass meets with employees of the MSA. (Photo: Jennifer Willoughby)

In association with the NMEC is a center for training programs which will be finished in one month. The center will train curators for the NMEC and other museums, such as the Grand Egyptian Museum, in museology. When I made my visit last week, I began in the entry area by meeting with senior employees of the MSA in order to discuss concerns about this and other projects. We were able to consider many options, and I feel that we are moving forward together with solutions. After the meeting, we all had a walkthrough of the Museum to view the progress. I have to say, this Museum is looking very good and it will be a very modern educational space. Our tour ended in the basement rooms for meetings, where we watched a brief film about the displays for the NMEC, and then I had a meeting with young people who work for the MSA. These young people come from all areas within the Ministry, and this was a chance to listen to them and their concerns. It was a very productive meeting.

Dr. Hawass views the entrance hall at the NMEC. (Photo: Jennifer Willoughby)

Fustat, the area in which the NMEC is located, is a fascinating area of Cairo, and the Museum provides views of Old Cairo and the pyramids of Giza. Next to the Museum is a beautiful lake. Nearby is another area, which will be separate from the Museum, but will be able to help pay for the maintenance. It will include a big shopping area with a movie theater. We will rent the shopping center to famous store, in order to supplement the income of the museum. I decided at this meeting that the NMEC will not be directly under the Ministry, but should be independent and have full authority over maintenance. The Ministry will oversee the antiquities, but the administration and operation will be independent. The structure of the Museum will be finished soon, and most of the objects for the scenario are chosen, but the most important aspect is the program for training curators that we are starting in conjunction with UNESCO.

Source: http://www.drhawass.com

Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955.

Posted by: Mohamed Mokhtar

Categories: Archaeology, Cairo Info, Egypt after the revolution, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Internternational Museums, Museums, The Egyptian Museum | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Twelve missing objects returned to the Egyptian Museum, Cairo

Twelve of the artifacts missing from the Egyptian Museum, Cairo have been returned, including six bronze statuettes dated to the Late Period, a small limestone statue of a sphinx, and five necklaces.

 

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo

It is unclear if the people who had possession of these antiquities had any relationship with the looters who broke into the museum. They attempted to try and authenticate the objects by contacting a young archaeologist, whose name I have withheld for his own safety, with the goal was of selling the stolen pieces. The archaeologist recognized the objects as those missing from the museum and took photographs with his mobile phone. He contacted the director of the museum and the police, and the people were taken into custody.
I believe that the rest of the missing antiquities will be found soon. It will be very difficult to sell any of the missing antiquities, and we will do everything in our power to have them returned.

Memphis Tours Egypt Since 1955
References:drhawass.com
Posted by: Shaimaa Ahmed

Categories: Ancient Egypt, Archaeology, Cairo history, Cairo Tour, Cultural Tourism, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Egypt Tours, Egypt Travel, Internternational Museums, Latest new in Egypt | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

All of Egypt’s archaeological sites reopened !!!

The Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square

The Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square

 

On 20 February 2011, all of Egypt’s archaeological sites and six of its antiquities museums reopened. In my opinion, the most important reopening was that of the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. After all the rumors surrounding the vandalism and thefts there I am happy to say that it is now truly safe. A complete inventory is still underway, but for now, it seems that relatively few objects are still missing. This is of course terrible, and we will continue to do everything we can to bring back these pieces as soon as possible; we still hope that they will turn up, as four of the objects that were originally reported as missing have been found already. However, it could have been far worse; all of the museum’s most iconic masterpieces are safe.

Giza Pyramids

Giza Pyramids

Over 1500 Egyptians visited the museum on Sunday; I believe that they wanted to see if I was true to my word. Many brought flowers and made it clear that they wanted international tourists to return. I am glad to report that about 90 foreign tourists from Brazil, Japan, Italy, Germany, and the Netherlands came to the museum. Tourists from both Egypt and abroad also visited Giza, Saqqara, and sites in Luxor.

Memphis Tours Egypt Since 1955
Reference: drhawass.com
Edited by: Shaimaa Ahmed

Categories: Ancient Egypt, Archaeology, Egypt after the revolution, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Egypt onboard, Latest new in Egypt, The Egyptian Museum | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Update on the current state of antiquities

Dr. Zahi Hawass, Minister of State for Antiquities Affairs, announced today that a committee of archaeologists completed a preliminary search of the Egyptian Museum, Cairo and its grounds. The missing Heart Scarab of Yuya was recovered on the west side of the museum gardens, near the new bookshop. Wooden fragments belonging to the damaged New Kingdom coffin, still on the second floor of the museum, were also found in this area. The search team also found one of the eleven missing shabtis of Yuya and Thuya underneath a showcase. Fragments belonging to the statue of Tutankhamun being carried by the goddess Menkaret have been found; all the located fragments belong to the figure of Menkaret. The small figure of the king has not yet been found.

Archive photo of one of the eleven missing shabti’s belonging to Yuya. (Photo courtesy of the Egyptian Museum, Cairo)

Archive photo of one of the eleven missing shabti’s belonging to Yuya. (Photo courtesy of the Egyptian Museum, Cairo)

Dr. Hawass said it seems the looters dropped objects as they fled, and every inch of the museum must be searched before the Registration, Collections Management, and Documentation Department, which is overseeing the inventory, can produce a complete and final report of exactly what is missing. The museum staff is not yet able to move freely within the museum, and has, until now, had to walk in groups of 10-15 people, accompanied by soldiers. Unfortunately, this has slowed down the search, and made it very difficult to carry out a final inventory. The army is allowing very few people into the museum, and the first time the museum’s office staff was allowed in was on 6 February 2011. The list announced in the press release of 12 February, 2011 is preliminary, and will continue to be updated as new information comes to light. As Dr. Hawass has previously stated, until a full and thorough search of the museum and its grounds has been completed and all of the damaged vitrines inventoried, a list of missing objects cannot be finalized.

Archive photo of Tutankhamun carried by Menkaret. (Photo courtesy of the Egyptian Museum, Cairo)

King Tut carried by Menkaret

Dr. Hawass would like to clarify earlier statements in which he announced that nothing was missing. During the first pass of the search committee through the museum, objects that were at first thought to be missing were found thrown into trash cans and corners far from their original locations, and he had been led to believe that a full sweep of the museum might well succeed in locating all of the missing objects. Professionals out to steal would normally be careful not to damage the objects they were planning to take, so the initial impression was that the attackers were vandals rather than thieves. He was also misinformed by one of the museum staff about the statue of Akhenaten as an offering bearer; he was told that this was only damaged when it was, in fact, missing. In addition to expressing what he then firmly believed, which was that museum staff would continue to locate the missing objects, his intent in these earlier statements was to reassure the world that the damage at the museum, while tragic, was far less widespread than originally feared, and to make clear that the museum’s most major masterpieces, such as the Golden Mask of Tutankhamun, were safe.

AFP (not, as reported in the Egyptian press, CNN) has reported that the famous golden mask of Tutankhamun was stolen. This is completely untrue. Last week, Dr. Hawass took several representatives of the press, including ABC World News, NBC, Associated Press, and Reuters, among others, to the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. All of the reporters and journalists were able to see, photograph, and film the mask still safely in its gallery, which is behind an iron gate that the looters were not able to penetrate. In addition, the two gold coffins and the items Howard Carter found on the mummy in 1925, all of which are in the same gallery, are safe as well. Dr. Hawass expressed his disappointment in AFP for announcing such a sensationalized story without first checking the facts. At 1:30 pm yesterday, Dr. Hawass received a call from Mr. Riad Abu Awad, the head of the AFP office in Egypt. He denied that his agency broke the story. However, many online newspapers seem to have quoted the AFP directly (North Korean News, Caribbean News, All Voices, Nvision UG Monitr, Nevada State News) Today, Dr. Hawass took members of the press to the museum to show them that the mask is safe.

On Sunday, Dr. Hawass received the report prepared by the committee he had sent to check the De Morgan magazine in Dahshur; according to this report, all of the large and small blocks are safe. The only missing items appear to be small amulets. Archaeologists at the site had previously installed an iron gate and ensured that guards were on duty guarding the magazine. Despite these precautions, Dr. Hawass announced that the magazine was attacked for a second time Monday night, and the thieves were able to overpower and tie up the guards. Dr. Hawass has appointed a new committee to determine the current state of the magazine.

A committee to review the magazine at Qantara East in the Sinai, has also been appointed by Dr. Hawass. This magazine suffered a break-in on the night of 28 January, 2011; looters stole boxes full of objects, of which, to date, 298 have been returned. The committee will take a full inventory and compare it to earlier inventories to determine whether or not everything has been returned.

Dr. Hawass said the most important news for today was that the Heart Scarab and the shabti were found on the museum grounds. He hopes that the committee still searching the museum will be able to locate more of the missing objects.

 

Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955
Posted by: Shaimaa Ahmed
Reference: drhawass.com

Categories: Ancient Egypt, Archaeology, Cairo history, Cairo Info, Cultural Tourism, Egypt News, Events In Egypt | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sad News from the Egyptian Museum

The staff of the database department at the Egyptian Museum, Cairo have given me their report on the inventory of objects at the museum following the break in. Sadly, they have discovered objects are missing from the museum. The objects missing are as follows:

 

1. Gilded wood statue of Tutankhamun being carried by a goddess

Tutankhamun being carried by a goddess. (Photo: Griffith Institute)

Tutankhamun being carried by a goddess. (Photo: Griffith Institute)

2. Gilded wood statue of Tutankhamun harpooning. Only the torso and upper limbs of the king are missing

3. Limestone statue of Akhenaten holding an offering table

4. Statue of Nefertiti making offerings

Akhenaten holding an offering table ( photo by Ken Garrett)

Akhenaten holding an offering table ( photo by Ken Garrett)

5. Sandstone head of an Amarna princess

6.Stone statuette of a scribe from Amarna

7. Wooden shabti statuettes from Yuya (11 pieces)

Tutankhamun harpooning. (Photo: Griffith Institute)

Tutankhamun harpooning. (Photo: Griffith Institute)

8. Heart Scarab of Yuya

 

An investigation has begun to search for the people who have taken these objects, and the police and army plan to follow up with the criminals already in custody. I have said if the Egyptian Museum is safe, than Egypt is safe. However, I am now concerned Egypt is not safe.

In another terrible turn of events, last night a magazine in Dahshur was broken into; it is called De Morgan’s. This magazine contains large blocks and small artifacts

Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955
Posted by: Shaimaa Ahmed
Reference: drhawass.com

Categories: Cairo history, Cairo Info, Cairo Tour, Discoveries in Egypt, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Egypt Travel | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Restoration continues at the Egyptian Museum, Cairo

I would like to begin by apologizing for not posting a statement yesterday; I gave several interviews from the conservation lab at the Egyptian Museum, Cairo in the morning, and had to attend a cabinet meeting in the afternoon that lasted most of the day. The conservation lab team has divided the objects affected by the disturbances in the Museum two weeks ago into several groups depending on their nature and damage sustained. The first group contains pieces that are all in good condition and do not need any restoration work.

 

Dr. Zahi standing in front of objects in the conservation lab in the Egyptian Mueum, Cairo. (PHOTO: Stephanie Sakoutis)

Dr. Zahi standing in front of objects in the conservation lab in the Egyptian Mueum, Cairo. (PHOTO: Stephanie Sakoutis)

Most, if not all, of these objects date to the Late Period. The second group contains objects that need minor restoration work. Some of the pieces in this group include statues of gods and goddess in good condition, and a faience vase with one piece broken off; this vase has already been repaired. The third group includes the pieces of the broken statue of Tutankhamun standing on a panther. This beautiful statue of gilded wood displays the standing king wearing the white crown of Upper Egypt, holding a flail in his right hand, and a staff in his left. The statue seems to have been used to smash other showcases, and unfortunately the left arm, holding the staff, has been broken off. The panther is broken at the legs, and its tail and right ear have also been broken. Much of the gilding from the statue has also been broken off. I am happy to say, despite the extent of the damage, that this can be restored in a few days time. The fourth group contains the damaged mummy bands of Thuya. Thuya and her husband Yuya were the parents of Queen Tiye, and the great-grandparents of Tutankhamun. Thuya’s mummy bands are gilded cartonnage, and thankfully, only one section was damaged. The upper part of one god was broken off the open work of the bands, but luckily no other damage was sustained. This object can be restored very quickly. The fifth group of objects includes statues and shabtis belonging to Yuya and Thuya and some dating to the Late Period. All of these objects are currently undergoing restoration. The final group includes the pieces belonging to a wooden boat model and pieces from the model troop of Nubian archers, both dating to the Middle Kingdom. These objects will also be able to undergo a full restoration.

Damaged Middle Kingdom wooden boat model. (PHOTO: Stephanie Sakoutis)

Damaged Middle Kingdom wooden boat model. (PHOTO: Stephanie Sakoutis)

I was able to visit the conservation lab at the Egyptian Museum yesterday with several members of the world wide press including, NBC News for the Today Show, ABC World News, Reuters, Associated Press, and journalists from Sweden, Japan, and Italy. I was pleased to show them the progress being made in the conservation lab, as well as the new showcases and the repaired New Kingdom coffin lid.

I spoke with Dr. Tarek El Awady, director of the Egyptian Museum, Dr. Yasmin el Shazly, head of documentation at the Museum, and database team; I have asked them to do a final check of the objects in the museum and the conservation lab against the database and prepare a report for me on Sunday. This report will confirm whether or not any objects have been taken from the museum.

A restorator working on the statue of Tutankhamun standing on a panther. (PHOTO: Stephanie Sakoutis)

A restorator working on the statue of Tutankhamun standing on a panther. (PHOTO: Stephanie Sakoutis)

Yesterday was the first time, since this crisis began, that I was able to take the time to closely examine each item that was damaged during the museum’s break in on Friday, 28 January, 2011. I also took time to speak to the commanders of the police and army stationed at the museum, and I asked them to update me on their investigations. I have heard so many differing stories about how the break in occurred, so I felt it was necessary to confirm the details with the police and army.

The information I have previously posted here on my website is very close to what the officers told me yesterday. At this point, the officers are not clear on exactly how many of the criminals actually entered into the museum, but ten people have been in custody since 28 January. One of these ten criminals was actually captured inside of the museum. This is the criminal I met when I arrived at the museum on the morning of Saturday, 29 January. In fact, he was still handcuffed to the iron bars of the exit doors to the new museum bookshop when I got there! This young criminal told me he had done nothing wrong; when I asked why he broke into the museum he began to cry and said, “They told me to.” I hope he will give the officers a detailed report of what had happened inside the museum.

While at the museum, I went and stood under the window that had been broken by the criminals. The distance between the window in the roof and the floor is nearly 30 feet! It seems that one of the criminals fell from the roof and landed on a glass case, so it was no surprise when we found blood on the floor throughout the museum. This trail of blood was helpful for the investigation, as it clearly showed which galleries the criminal had entered.

I received a report from the chief of the tourist police that criminals had entered the storage magazine in Tuna el Gebel. This report indicated that two mummies, dating to the Roman Period, were missing. However, the curator has also sent me a report saying that nothing actually happened at the magazine. I hope to receive further information on this matter very soon.

Memphis Tours Egypt Since 1955
Reference: drhawass.com
Posted by: Shaimaa Ahmed

Categories: Archaeology, Egypt News, Latest new in Egypt, Museums | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The restoration of the damaged objects at the Egyptian Museum, Cairo

Today I would like to discuss, in detail, some of the objects that were broken at the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. In front of the Amarna galleries, on the first floor of the museum, there is a vitrine that holds a small statue of Akhenaten wearing the blue crown and holding an offering table. This vitrine was smashed, and the statue sustained minor damage, this is the first object that will be cleaned and restored.

 

Upstairs, in front of the room that holds the golden mask of Tutankhamun, a vitrine containing two walking sticks and the head of a gilded fan belonging to the king. One stick was stripped of its thin gold sheeting when it was thrown on the floor, but it can be restored, this case and the one containing the statue of Tutankamun standing on a panther, were the only Tutankhamun cases that suffered from any damage. I carefully rechecked all the other vitrines in the Tutankhamun galleries, and I would like to assure the world that they are safe and untouched.

The New Kingdom coffin that was damaged by the criminals can easily be restored. These people were searching for mummies in the hopes that they would find gold and red mercury, believed by some people to have magical properties. I think that this shows the ignorance of the thieves.

I have received many queries on the members of Akhenaten’s family, while at the museum yesterday, I made sure to visit the mummies of Akhenaten (the mummy from KV55), Queen Tiye (also known as the Elder Lady from KV35), and the mother of Tutankhamun (also known as the Younger Lady from KV35). These three mummies are housed in vitrines next to the second royal mummy room on the west side of the museum, and were not touched or damaged by the looters. They are completely safe.

The museum staff and I have begun to replace the broken vitrines, and to clean the museum and the new bookshop. We are working hard to prepare the museum for its reopening.

Memphis Tours Egypt Since 1955
Reference:drhawass.com
Posted by: Shaimaa Ahmed

Categories: Egypt Latest news, Egypt onboard, Egypt Tours, Egypt Travel, Latest new in Egypt, Museums | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Parts of Amenhotep III’s double statue uncovered in Luxor

Six missing pieces belonging to the double statue of 18th Dynasty’s King Amenhotep III were uncovered at his funerary temple in Luxor

Dr,Zahi Hawass ans the uncovered fragments

Dr,Zahi Hawass ans the uncovered fragments

130 years after the discovery of the colossal of King Amenhotep III and his wife Queen Tiye, six missing statue pieces have been uncovered at the king’s funerary temple on Luxor’s west bank. The colossal double statue is currently the centerpiece of the main hall at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. The fragments were found during excavation work carried out by an Egyptian team under the directions of Zahi Hawass, secretary general of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA).

At the excavation site, Culture Minister Farouk Honsi stated that the parts were discovered130 years after French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette unearthed the double statue in Medinet Habu on the west bank of the Nile.

Hawass explained that when the statue was first discovered in 1889 an Italian team restored it, filling in the missing pieces with modern stonework. Several of the newly discovered pieces belong to the figure of Amenhotep III’s, making up the right side of the chest, nemes headdress, and leg. The pieces belonging to the statue of Queen Tiye include a section of her wig and pieces from her left arm, fingers and foot. A small section of the base of the double statue was also found.

The measurements of the six missing fragments range from 47cm to 103cm. These pieces are currently being held at the site of Amenhotep III’s mortuary temple on the west bank, but will soon be relocated to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, where they will be restored and fitted into the colossal.

Amenhotep III’s double statue

Amenhotep III’s double statue

Archaeologist Abdul Ghafar Wagdy, the supervisor of the excavation at the site in Luxor, said that these pieces were found as part of a project to lower the ground water on the west bank of Luxor. These fragments are only a few of nearly 1,000 pieces that have been found dating from the Pharonic era to Coptic era

Memphis Tours Egypt Since 1955
Reference: ahram.org.eg
Posted By: Shaimaa Ahmed

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