Posts Tagged With: Cairo

The Tourism Minister Inaugurated a Marina for The Special Needs

 

Egyptian Minister of Tourism Mounir Fakhry Abdel Nour today inaugurated the first marina for people with special needs in the Middle East and North Africa.

The inauguration comes during World Tourism Day festivities in Aswan, Upper Egypt.

This marina is a turning point for Egyptian tourism as it works toward meeting the needs of all tourism demands, and it provides the means for comfort, said Abdel Nour.

“Egypt will launch Nile cruisers from Cairo to Luxor and Aswan; the Nile crusiers will have a powerful impact in reviving Egyptian tourism.”

“The Amarco Nile Cruise Company resumed this project despite the halt in Nile cruises,” said the company’s CEO Mohammed Othman, adding that the company expects an improvement in the future.

The new marina costs about seven million EGP (U.S. $1.17 million) and construction is expected to take one year. The project provides full-service for special needs tourists, including transport from Aswan Airport to the marina, Othman said.

“The project also includes a floating hotel with a special escalator,” he added.

The floating hotel will have two royal suites, each of which is 116 meters. There will be four main suites measuring 76 meters and 48 suites measuring 38 meters.

The hotel will also have a conference hall large enough to hold 350 people, a health club, a gym and other 5-star level equipment.

“This new project will help activate tourism for people with special needs from all over the world, roughly 750 million people in the Arab and European world,” Othman added.

Thirty-five million such people exist in the Middle East, according to recent statistics from the World Tourism Organization.

Deputy Chairman of Amarco Kamar Samir today assured the return of Nile cruises from Cairo to Aswan.

First Assistant to the Minister of Tourism Hisham Zaazou, Tourism Ministry’s Advisor to the Ambassador Helmy Bedir, other leaders in the Tourism Ministry and leaders in the Union and Tourism sector attended the inauguration.

Reference : egypt4tours.net
Posted by : Memphis Tours Egypt
Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955
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Categories: Accessible Tours, Cairo Info, current events in egypt, Egypt after the revolution, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Egypt Tours, Egypt Travel, Events In Egypt | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Best Seven Ancient Tourist Attractions in Egypt.

“In Upper Egypt, so many people make their living from tourism, they won’t let anything happen to a tourist. It would be like attacking themselves,” Thomas said. “Most Egyptian people are kind and generous and consider you to be their guest in their country. They feel it’s their duty to make you happy.”

Okay, but this is Cairo — 20 million-plus people squished between the Nile and the Egyptian desert — even if everyone I met here, including those seven folks I’d asked directions of during a solo walk from the Cairo Marriott to the Ramses shopping centre, Tahrir Square and Egyptian Museum were helpful.

If you’re hesitant taking that once in a lifetime trip to Egypt, don’t be. Eight months after the overthrow of former president Hosni Mubarek, life in Egypt — jewel of the Nile and spell-binding North Africa — is pretty much back to normal. There have been two deadly confrontations between protesters and the army since, but both incidents were localized and none involved visitors to the country.

Egypt is quite likely the safest country in the Middle East and Africa. Tourism also is the country’s second-most important industry (next to the Suez canal).

Five million visitors arrived in Egypt in 2010, many lured by the irresistible Red Sea resort towns of Sharm El Sheikh and Hugearta. Others, like myself, came to see the great pyramids of Giza, the temples of Luxor, Valley of the Kings, the Nile, eclectic Aswan, the Sahara desert and so much else this diverse country has to offer. While tourism suffered during the first six months following the revolution, numbers are edging up again slowly.

Egypt is the cradle of civilization — so ancient that centuries before the Greeks invented Zeus, Apollo and Aphrodite, the Pharaohs already had erected gold temples to their gods: Amun (creator), Ra (Sun god) and Isis (goddess of motherhood, magic and fertility).

And, while there are Roman catacombs in Alexandria and Greek ruins in Cairo, the ancient world of the Pharaohs exists only in Egypt.

Here’s what impressed the most:

1. EGYPTIAN MUSEUM: If museum-strolling were a sport, a visit to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo would equate withscoring a seat to the World Cup soccer final. Nearly 200,000 visitors flocked to the Art Gallery of Ontario a few years ago to view 100 artifacts belonging to the Egyptian Pharaohs. Imagine, then, the drawing power of this overwhelming collection. Built in 1902, this two-storey, 42-room museum contains 120,000 ancient artifacts, including the mummies of 27 pharaohs, their gold thrones, coffins, jewels, art — you name it — plus the massive King Tut collection. While plans are afoot to relocate the museum near the great pyramids of Giza, the move is not imminent.

2. NILE RIVER CRUISE: About 85 million people live in Egypt, most of them in cities and towns hugging the Nile. It has been this way forever, so a river cruise is easily the best and most relaxing way to see historical Egypt. Just don’t expect five-star amenities. We sailed on the Ra 2, a typical flatboat with 75 cabins, a small deck-top swimming pool, one restaurant (buffet) and three bars, with not much in the way of entertainment. But when you’re sailing down the river of the Pharaohs, Cleopatra, Alexander the Great and Napoleon — nursing an Egyptian Stella (beer) — what’s not to like?

3. VALLEY OF THE KINGS — TOMBS: There were at least 63 Pharaohs buried here, in private, multi-roomed tombs, complete with elaborate story-telling murals and hieroglyphic script dating back to 1,700 BC. While grave-robbers emptied the first 62, Tut’s tomb — buried underneath King Ramses VI — wasn’t discovered until 1922 and remained untouched and over-flowing with priceless gold, jewelry and other antiquities, most of it now on display at the Egyptian Museum.

4. ASWAN, HIGH DAM, PHILAE TEMPLE: Located near the Tropic of Cancer, this city of 300,000 is home to the Aswan Dam, an incredible feat of engineering that re-routed the Nile, but flooded Nubian villages and several historic temples, including Philae. Philae was reconstructed block by block while new homes were purchased for the Nubians, many of whom make their living designing exotic, camel-bone jewelry.

5. KARNAK AND LUXOR TEMPLES: Karnak Temple is the largest in the world, as each successive Pharaoh felt obliged to add his own rooms. Karnak was featured in the James Bond classic, The Spy Who Loved Me, and is just down the road from the equally bewitching Temple of Luxor.

6. COPTIC CAIRO DISTRICT: Here, on the banks of the Nile, is where the baby Moses was discovered by the Pharaoh’s daughter; and where Joseph, Mary and Jesus hid out for three-and-a-half years. Cairo, itself, is an acquired taste, but enchanting when lit up at night.

7. THE GREAT PYRAMIDS/SPHINX OF GIZA: Amazing! The pyramids and sphinx are Egypt’s most recognizable symbols and can’t be missed.

Reference: Torontosun

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Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955

Categories: Adventure Tours, Ancient Egypt, Cairo history, Cairo Info, Cairo Tour, Classical Tours, Cultural Tourism, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Egypt Tours, Egypt Travel, Entertainment, Family Tours, Latest new in Egypt, Museums, Nile Cruise, Shore Excursions, Sightseeing Tours, The Egyptian Museum | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Spanish and Egyptian, Break-dancing and graffiti night

Thursday night, in the stark warehouse space of the Townhouse Gallery, a small crowd of young men and women stood

around drinking soda and smoking cigarettes. Many wore track jackets and over-sized baseball caps, baggy clothes and

Adidas shoes. Some posed to have their pictures taken in front of graffiti adorning the walls, folding their arms, leaning back, and letting the brims of their hats cover their eyes.

This was the first night of the fourth annual Urban Culture Gathering, sponsored by a long list of institutions, including the Spanish Embassy in Cairo-Egypt, the Egyptian Sector of Foreign Cultural Relations, and the Townhouse Gallery.

Over the course of three nights, several events took place to display how “Spanish and Egyptian youth speak the same cultural language,” including “hip-hop, rap, graffiti, b-boying, free-styling, and parkour.”

For the first night, two Spanish graffiti artists had spent the day covering the bare walls of the constantly reinvented

Townhouse. DEN, from Bilbao, and ZETA, from Madrid, had collaborated to the point that their two individual styles blended seamlessly together.

On one wall, a young boy, his hair highlighted with turquoise, looks sideways at the Ottoman-style domes and minarets of the Mohamed Ali mosque. Across the room, a pair of hands held a pair of ritualistic Pharaonic staves. Below the hands, an intricately detailed scarab sprouted huge, multi-colored wings.

Much of the imagery was Pharaonic and Islamic, signaling a desire among the artists to tailor their work to the cultural exchange represented by the festival. Surprisingly, though, none of the art referenced the revolution in January. In Cairo, graffiti, a form of painting that has historically been overtly political, has been totally subsumed by the themes of the revolution, and so here the absence of those themes — of tanks, Tahrir and crowds — was striking.

After a few minutes of standing around looking at the graffiti, a few dancers showed each other their moves tentatively. The music slowly grew louder and louder until it took over the room, and the dancers grew in number and seriousness.

Eventually they cleared away to make room for two young Spanish women, who launched into an impressive, quick hip-hop dance routine. After a minute or so, a third woman, in spray painted stockings, replaced them, whipping her body
Hip-hop, generally speaking, is a minor presence in Cairo, so one wouldn’t expect break-dancing to have taken off, but somehow it has. Developed in the 1970s in African American and Latino neighborhoods of New York City, break-dancing (also known as b-boying) became famous throughout urban areas in the US in the 1980s. One famous break-dancer, known as Crazy Legs, called the dance “a true American art form.” around violently in circles.

Everyone watching the first few dancers cheered, and everyone else in the room jogged over to gather around the dancing area. A succession of 30-second solo dances proceeded in rapid fire. An Egyptian young man in a striped sweater vest glided through a hip-hop rendition of the “robot.” Another burst into the center, splaying his legs and spinning in stunningly fast circles, making way for another dancer who walked on his hands. The final dancer virtuosically held a soccer ball between his foot and calf as he spun his body in quick, acrobatic circles.

The crowd of Spaniards and Egyptians watched, mesmerized. A form of dance developed in New York City in the 1970s was bringing together two groups of young men and women across the Mediterranean.

Reference: Daily News Egypt

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Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955

Categories: Cairo Info, Egypt after the revolution, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Entertainment, Events In Egypt, Festivals, Latest new in Egypt | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Egypt to restore ancient boat found near pyramid

CAIRO, Egypt (AP): Archaeologists have begun excavating a 4,500-year-old wooden boat found next to the Great Pyramid of Giza, one of Egypt’s main tourist attractions, Egypt’s top antiquities official said Thursday.

The boat is one of two buried next to the pharaoh Khufu in what appeared to be a religious custom to carry him in the afterlife. Khufu, also known as Cheops, is credited with building the Great Pyramid of Giza.

Sakuji Yoshimura, a Waseda University professor who is leading the restoration project with Egypt’s Antiquities Council, said scientists discovered that the second ship is inscribed with Khufu’s name.

Khufu founded the 4th Dynasty around 2680 B.C. and ruled Egypt for 23 years.

Zahi Hawass, Minister of State for Antiquities, called the excavation “one of the most important archaeological and conservation projects in the world.” He hoped its display would boost tourism in Egypt, which has fallen sharply since the country’s popular revolution that deposed President Hosni Mubarak in February.

The boat was originally found in 1954 along with another ship, which was restored and is regarded as one of the most significant discoveries on the Giza plateau for its age, size and condition. Experts say the ships are the oldest surviving vessels from antiquity.

The second boat is thought to be smaller than its sister ship, which is about 140 feet (43 meters) long.

Using a pulley system, a team of scientists lifted the first of 41 limestone slabs, each weighing about 16 tons, to uncover fragments of the ancient ship. Over the next two months, experts expect to unearth about 600 pieces from the boat’s underground resting place. Restoration is expected to take about four years, and then it will be displayed at the Solar Boat Museum near the huge pyramid, which routinely attracts millions of tourists, boosting one of Egypt’s most important industries.

Both boats were made from Lebanese cedar and Egyptian acacia trees.

The experts hope to restore the second ship as successfully as the first. Hawass said the boat’s condition was better than he expected. “I was really afraid when I first saw the wood,” he said. “I am very optimistic that in four years there will be another boat.”

The entombed boat remained untouched until 1987, when a team from the National Geographic Society threaded a tiny camera under the site’s limestone surface to see what lay beneath and found it. Other similar cavities nearby were empty.

After receiving a $10 million grant from Waseda University, Egyptian and Japanese scientists in 2008 began preparing for the ship’s excavation process, conducting environmental surveys and building a temperature and humidity controlled structure around the site.

After the excavation process is complete, scientists will devise a computerized schematic of the boat to aid in its reconstruction.

Source: http://english.youm7.com

Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955

Posted By: Mohamed Mokhtar

Categories: Archaeology, Cairo history, Cairo Info, current events in egypt, Discoveries in Egypt, Egypt after the revolution, Egypt Hotels, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Egypt Travel, Latest Discoveries in Egypt, Latest new in Egypt | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

Grand Egyptian Museum final phase construction to begin

The Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM) in Egypt has received a grant of LE300 million ($50.4 million) loan from the Japanese Government for completion of the final phase.

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GEM is designed to provide an Egyptology centre of excellence for the next 100 years and will be sited near the pyramids of Giza. Arup is working on the design of the museum as part of a joint venture after winning an international architectural competition.

The museum will occupy a 50-acre site and will feature a translucent stone wall that will be 800m long. The wall will rise to 40m, allowing visitors to explore the sheltered space. Illuminated by the dramatic lighting schemes of the main building, the wall will add night-time drama to the desert landscape.

The main building will house the museum and a conference centre, connected by a large shaded courtyard and a exhibition space with 800-seat auditorium. The new building will house a restaurant, ticketing facilities and other services. On a separate part of the site, the conservation and energy centre will house special laboratories for cleaning, cataloguing and restoring artefacts.

The statue of King Tut would be the main attraction, including a number of artifacts from the Egyptian Museum that will be transferred to the GEM once the development is completed. Soft landscaping will provide outdoor leisure areas with internal circulation and access roads winding between them.

The museum will feature 100,000 artifacts with the government to spend $100 million on storage rooms and a renovation center for the GEM. Construction work would begin in mid-November 2011 and is scheduled to be completed by March 2015.

Source:http://www.worldinteriordesignnetwork.com

Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955.

Posted By Mohamed Mokhtar

Categories: Archaeology, Cairo Info, current events in egypt, Egypt after the revolution, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Egypt Travel | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

School of Museology to open in Cairo

School of Museology to open in Cairo

Egypt’s first ever academic institute for Museology will be established in Cairo by the Ministry of State for Antiquities (MSA). The institute will be set up in Casdagli Palace in the Down Town area with an initial intake of 60 students.

The institute will train Egyptian museum curators and conservators on the recent innovations and new technology used in museums for improved displays, object restoration and general museological skills. Courses will be two years in duration and will be accredited by the Egyptian Ministry of Higher Education two years after the institute’s foundation. Eventually, it will also be able to offer MA and PhD programs in Museum Studies and Heritage Management.

Dr. Zahi Hawass, Minister of State for Antiquities, has reported that the project is being made possible with a generous grant of $5 million from USAID provided through the Ministry of International Cooperation.

Dr. Ramadan Hussein, Archaeological Supervisor at the MSA, said that the institute of Museology will seek professional collaboration with international museum organizations like the American Association of Museums and the International Council of Museums’ Committee for Egyptology, in order to develop curricula and training programs modeled on international standards of museum practice. In addition, the MSA will be recruiting foreign and Egyptian professionals to assist with its teaching and training programs. The institute will admit trainees and students from amongst the MSA’s current museum staff as well as others who are seeking jobs in Egyptian museums.

Source: http://www.drhawass.com

Memphis Tours Egypt since 1955.

Posted By: Mohamed Mokhtar

Categories: Archaeology, Cairo Info, current events in egypt, Egypt after the revolution, Egypt Latest news, Egypt News, Egypt Travel, Events In Egypt | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Objects Returned to the Museum

It seems that every week we have some good news here. I was very happy earlier this week when four objects were returned to the Egyptian Museum.

Dr. Tarek El Awady, the Director of the Egyptian Museum, examines the artifacts that were returned. (Photo: Rania Galal)

The people who were caught with antiquities from the Egyptian Museum were sentenced to 15 years in jail and fined heavily. I hope through these strict punishments we will deter people from dealing in antiquities here. It seems that the people who entered the Museum on the night of January 28thknew they could not do anything with these objects. They cannot sell them because no one will buy them, they have been publicized. They also cannot keep them because of the penalties. However, one of them had a conscience, because he took a bag and put it in a metro station, and by accident a person opened the bag and saw artifacts inside. At 9 am I found this person on the steps of my office with the bag. I opened it and was amazed to see these missing objects!

The objects were: a gilded statue of King Tut, the lower part is in the Museum and it will be restored. Also a wooden shabti of Yuya and Tjuya that came back in excellent condition, so we will put it back on display right away.  Another object was a fan that had been damaged, which we will also restore and return to display. The last object is the two pieces of the trumpet, which is also still in good condition.

We are still missing 37 objects from the Egyptian Museum, but I hope that soon we will be able to find them all and return them to the Museum.

from http://www.drhawass.com

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Categories: Archaeology, Cairo Info, Egypt after the revolution, Egypt News, Internternational Museums, Museums, The Egyptian Museum | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Press Release – Four Objects Return to the Egyptian Museum

Four objects missing from the Egyptian Museum since the January Revolution have been returned, announced Dr. Zahi Hawass, Minister of State for Antiquities.

 

 

 

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The four objects that returned to the Museum. (Photo: Rania Galal)

The objects returned include the gilded wooden statue of Tutankhamun standing in a boat throwing a harpoon (JE 60710.1). The statue suffered slight damage; a small part of the crown is missing as well as pieces of the legs. The boat is still in the Museum, and the figure of the king will be reunited with it and restored.

 

The second returned object is one of the 10 missing shabtis of Yuya and Tjuya (JE 68984). It is still in very good condition; it does not require restoration and will be placed on display again immediately, stated Dr. Tarek El-Awady, Director of the Egyptian Museum.

The third object is the gilded bronze and wooden trumpet of Tutankhamun (JE 62008). It was also received in excellent condition and will be put on display immediately.

Also returned was a part of Tutankhamun’s fan. One face is in good condition while the other has been broken into 11 pieces. Part of the royal fan JE 62006 still missing.

From http://www.drhawass.com

http://www.memphistours.com

 

 

Categories: 25th january revolution | Tags: , | Leave a comment

From Egypt With Love…

Egypt can be the perfect place for couples to rekindle their romantic spark, or just keep the fires burning hot in some of the most romantic spots in the world. That is, if you know where to look. Egypt Today has scoured the nation in search of the best destinations to partake in candle-lit dinners, walks on the beach and oasis spa treatments.

Despite Cairo’s hectic pace, the capital has several nooks and crannies where couples can steal a quiet moment alone to watching the sun set over the Nile. There are few places in the city where you’ll find greenery, but Al-Azhar Park is the best of them. The parkis a wonderful escape from Cairo’s urban stress. Atop the park’s main hill is an ideal spot for a picnic and offers a great view of the Citadel. For those who would rather enjoy finer fare, two cafés on-site offer a variety of salads, main courses, coffees and Arab sweets. One of the cafés overlooks a small lake, while the other has a garden vista.

Nothing says amour in Cairo like a felucca along the Nile at sunset. Though there are boats, such as the Grand Hyatt’s Marquise, that offer dinner and a belly dancing show, there is a certain je ne sais quoi about hiring your own private love boat for an hour.

Memories by the Mediterranean

The best part of Alexandria is its long stretch of beaches, from Qait Bay Fortress all the way to Montazah. Start your day with breakfast (or brunch) at the Helnan Palestine Hotel inside Montazah Gardens, where you can enjoy freshly-made croissants and a gorgeous view of the beach. If you own a cabin in Montazah, take advantage of it; beaches like Nefertiti and Cleopatra make intimate and discreet picnic spots.

For lunch and dinner dates, walk along the Eastern Harbor’s Corniche to the area around Qait Bay Fortress. The Greek Club overlooking the harbor and fortress is bound to delight your partner, as is the Chinese restaurant on the rooftop of the Sofitel Cecil Hotel, with its sweeping view of the entire harbor.

The Breathtaking Red Sea

Wherever there’s a beach, there’s bound to be a romantic spot, but settle only for the best. The Red Sea’s top two favorites are El-Gouna and Marsa Alam. El-Gouna is the spot to see and be seen for both couples and singles alike. Lazing by the beach is an El-Gouna staple, but couples looking for an extra thrill can take wake-boarding or kite-surfing classes together.

Come nightfall, a candlelight dinner at the French restaurant Bleu overlooking the marina is a must. Following dinner, couples can take a midnight stroll by the boats or dance the night away at Tabasco. The club is popular, but not too crowded, so you can enjoy dancing with your date without too much intrusion.

If you’re having trouble sealing the deal with a special someone, Marsa Alam is the perfect place to sweep them off their feet. During the day, go snorkeling with the dolphins at Samadai Reef, better known as the Dolphin House. Follow it up with a picnic on the coast, where oftentimes you can have a whole beach to yourself.

As the moon rises, cuddle up in any of the cafes on the beach (literally, on the beach), and watch the stars emerge while sipping freshly brewed tea from the mountains. Marsa Alam has several posh resorts along the coast like Kahramana Beach Resort, or simpler and more environmentally friendly huts, tents and stone chalets, such as Ecolodge Shagara. For a top of the line Marsa Alam experience, stay in Port Ghalib, a luxurious resort community with five-star hotels and a shopping street, as well as a lagoon and marina.

Desert DreamingCamels ride in Egypt desert

Are you and your significant other having trouble getting some time to yourselves? There’s nowhere more isolated than a oasis in the middle of the Western Desert. Siwa’s easygoing people, delicate organic cuisine and accommodations seemingly designed with the romantic desert getaway in mind make the oasis an undiscovered gem for couples.A quick romantic evening that doesn’t take much planning is a Bedouin dinner amid the dunes. Most hotels offer forays into the sand or can recommend a good guide with an off-road vehicle.

There are also several springs to visit in the area, such as Cleopatra’s Bath, Fatnas Spring and Bir Wahed lake, where couples can have a picnic and swim.

Bahareyya, Farafra, and Al-Dakhla oases also offer worthwhile excursions for adventurous couples and are a good starting point for deep desert tours. From Bahareyya and Farafra, arrange a tour of the Black and White deserts, coupled with nights under the stars in a Bedouin camp. Private or group tours can be arranged in the towns or through your hotel. But before you go, spend a lazy day of reading and eating dates underneath palm trees in any one of the tiny hotels in the oasis towns and get a real feel for life in a small village out in the middle of the desert.

Sinai
Sharm El-Sheikh is a no-brainer for couples, with its long stretches of beach, resorts and exclusive private yachts for rent. But for a more intimate experience, try Ras Shitan, about 15 kilometers from Nuweiba. Its quiet beaches and pristine desert landscape can’t be beat.

If camps aren’t your thing, but you still want to avoid Sharm’s resort-laden coast, try Dahab. Known for its great diving, Dahab’s hotels and hostels near the Eel Garden are great places to spend quality time with your loved one while sipping a fruit shake in the sun.

Climbing Mount Sinai during the night to see the sunrise is the way most people do St. Catherine. Sunrise is the traditional goal of the climb, and it is definitely worth seeing, but you will be sharing the experience with a few hundred other dawn devotees. For a more intimate experience, make the hike in the afternoon so you can sit in silence and watch the rays of the setting sun paint the surrounding mountains in dramatic reds and oranges.

Upper Egypt

In the capital, feluccas and dinner cruises reign on the river, but for a proper multi-day cruise, Upper Egypt is the place to be. Nile cruises start from either Aswan or Luxor and range from three to seven days, depending on direction and number of stops. These floating hotels take care of all the planning for you, from transportation and tickets to the antiquities sites along the way to full board meals and evening entertainment programs.

The one drawback to a Nile cruise is its popularity. There are tens of cruise ships en route at any given time, except when the Esna locks are closed for maintenance in June and December, so the river gets awfully crowded near the tourist sites. A more isolated option is the Lake Nasser cruise: there are less than 10 boats authorized to operate on the world’s largest man-made lake. In addition to visiting a number of little-known antiquities sites, you and your companion can sip mocktails and clink glasses as you cross the Tropic of Cancer.

Known as one of the most beautiful places in the country, Aswan is a treat for couples with a yen for exploring. It’s a wonderful place to enjoy sunrises and sunsets while indulging with your evening or morning ahwa. One of the most picturesque corners of the country is Philae Island, with the Greco-Roman temples amid the flowering landscape.

After taking in the local ruins, particularly on Elephantine Island, check out the Sharia Al-Souq. Behind conventional shops and touristy peddlers are winding alleys with market fare accented by the city’s Nubian roots. Off the beaten path is Sculpture Park, home to world-renowned works from international sculptors. The park, housing the art created during Aswan’s annual sculpture symposium, is on the way to the Philae Island boat dock, so arrange transportation in advance. et et

Refernce: Egypt Today.

Posted by : Yasmine Aladdin

Categories: 1, Accessible Tours, Budget Tours, Classical Tours, Combo Tours, Cultural Tourism, Dahabiyas in Egypt Nile, Egypt Hotels, Events In Egypt, Family Tours, Honeymooners, Luxury Holidays (VIP), Nile Cruise, Scuba Diving, Shore Excursions, Sightseeing Tours, Special Offers in Egypt | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Monuments Sightseeing in Cairo Egypt Downtown

ALTHOUGH TODAY’S Downtown Cairo Is a modern bustle of people, cars, banks, and theaters, underneath all that is a tribute to some of Egypt’s earliest and most prominent nationalist leaders. From Midan Saad Zaghloul at the Qasr El-Nil Bridge to Mohammed Farid’s statue at Ezbekiah Gardens, we gives you a list of historical statues to follow through Downtown Cairo, commemorating the men who challenged the British Empire in the early twentieth century.

Saad Zaghloul

JULY 1859 – AUGUST 1927 Prime Minister and founder of the Wafd Party; leader of the nationalist movement.  Arrested and jailed several times for fomenting protests against the British Protectorate, Zaghloul and several others were exiled to Malta in March 1919. In events now known as the 1919 Revolu­tion, an outraged populace rioted against his exile, forcing the British to let him return. He continued to lead protests and was deported once more in 1921, but the nationalists had gained momentum and the protectorate officially ended in 1922. Zaghloul was elected prime minister in 1924, but held the post for just 11 months, resigning in protest of British demands on the government.

Statue: The government contracted sculptor Mahmoud Mokhtar (1891 – March 1934) in 1930 to construct two statues of Saad Zaghloul, one in Alexandria and the other in front of Cairo’s Opera House Com­plex at the end of Qasr El-Nil Bridge.

Talaat Harb Pasha

NOVEMBER  25, 1867 – AUGUST 23, 1941
Economist, nationalist, lawyer, and founder of Banque Misr (The Bank of Egypt) and its group of companies.
an ardent nationalist, Harb called for economic freedom from colonial investments and was a major force behind the nation’s industrialization in the twentieth-century, writing extensively on the issue of economic reform. His brainchild was Banque Misr, created to foster Egyptian economic independence, which by the 1952 Revolution had grown to be one of the leading financial establishments. In 1980, then-President Anwar Sadat celebrated the sixtieth anniversary of Banque Misr by awarding Talaat Harb a posthumous Nile Collar – the highest Egyptian civilian decoration.

Statue: The five-meter bronze statue in Midan Talaat Harb, on the street of the same name, was sculpted by Fathi Mahmoud and erected in March 1964.

Mohamed Farid

Nationalist leader, writer, and lawyer.
Farid first worked as a lawyer for the Egyptian government but was dismissed after backing Sheikh Ali Yusuf, a popular newspaper editor who was tried for publishing secret telegrams taken from the War Ministry. Farid was the main political and financial supporter of Mustafa Kamil, and after a falling out with Yusuf, Farid used his own funds to launch Kamil’s newspaper, Al-Liwa. After Kamil’s death in 1908, Farid became head of the Nationalist Party despite opposition from Kamil’s family; his popularity dwindled with his attacks on the Copts and his support for Turkey. The 1910 assassination of the Coptic Prime Minister Boutros Ghali by Nationalist Party member Ibrahim Wardani turned the public against the party; in 1912, Farid left the country after being sentenced to six months imprisonment for ‘publishing seditious material. His support of the Axis cause during World War I was not a popular stance, and when Saad Zaghloul revived the nationalist cause with the Wafd Party in 1918, Farid was deliberately uninvited. He died in exile in Berlin the following year.
Statue: Located in Ezbekiah Garden, the statue of Mohammed Farid Pasha was sculpted by Mansour Farag.

Mustafa Kamil

AUGUST 14, 1874 – February 10, 1908
Journalist and leader of the modern national alist movement. Kamil was the most charismatic nationalist figure until Saad Zghloul’s rise post-World War One. Anti-British from the start, Kamil was originally pro-palace working closely with Khedive Abbas and Ali Yusuf, editor of the newspaper Al-Muayyad (The Supported One). Relations turned sour and Kamil founded his own paper, Al-Liwa (The Standard) with Mohamed Farid.Kamil also founded the Nationalist party in December 1907, two months before his death.

Statue: Sculpted by Leopold Savine with atelier Rene Fulda, the 2.8 meter tall bronze statue of Mustafa Kamil was first displayed at the May 1910 Paris exhibition of fine Arts. It wasn’t unveiled in Egypt until May 1940, after professors at Cairo and Al_Azhar universities rallied the government. King Farouk himself unveiled the statue,  which  now stands in Mustafa Kamil Square off of Qasr El-Nil and Mohammed Farid Street

From www.memphistours.com

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