Peru back it’s antiquities

Parts of Amenhotep III’s double statue uncovered in Luxor

Six missing pieces belonging to the double statue of 18th Dynasty’s King Amenhotep III were uncovered at his funerary temple in Luxor

Dr,Zahi Hawass ans the uncovered fragments

Dr,Zahi Hawass ans the uncovered fragments

130 years after the discovery of the colossal of King Amenhotep III and his wife Queen Tiye, six missing statue pieces have been uncovered at the king’s funerary temple on Luxor’s west bank. The colossal double statue is currently the centerpiece of the main hall at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. The fragments were found during excavation work carried out by an Egyptian team under the directions of Zahi Hawass, secretary general of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA).

At the excavation site, Culture Minister Farouk Honsi stated that the parts were discovered130 years after French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette unearthed the double statue in Medinet Habu on the west bank of the Nile.

Hawass explained that when the statue was first discovered in 1889 an Italian team restored it, filling in the missing pieces with modern stonework. Several of the newly discovered pieces belong to the figure of Amenhotep III’s, making up the right side of the chest, nemes headdress, and leg. The pieces belonging to the statue of Queen Tiye include a section of her wig and pieces from her left arm, fingers and foot. A small section of the base of the double statue was also found.

The measurements of the six missing fragments range from 47cm to 103cm. These pieces are currently being held at the site of Amenhotep III’s mortuary temple on the west bank, but will soon be relocated to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, where they will be restored and fitted into the colossal.

Amenhotep III’s double statue

Amenhotep III’s double statue

Archaeologist Abdul Ghafar Wagdy, the supervisor of the excavation at the site in Luxor, said that these pieces were found as part of a project to lower the ground water on the west bank of Luxor. These fragments are only a few of nearly 1,000 pieces that have been found dating from the Pharonic era to Coptic era

Memphis Tours Egypt Since 1955
Reference: ahram.org.eg
Posted By: Shaimaa Ahmed

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Categories: Accessible Tours, Adventure Tours, Ancient Egypt, Archaeology, Budget Tours, Cairo history, Cairo Info, Cairo Tour, Classical Tours, Combo Tours, Cultural Tourism, Dahabiyas in Egypt Nile, Discoveries in Egypt, Egypt Hotels, Egypt Latest news, Egypt onboard, Egypt Travel, Events In Egypt, Family Tours, Internternational Museums, Latest Discoveries in Egypt, Latest new in Egypt, Luxury Holidays (VIP), Museums, Nile Cruise, Peru back it's antiquities, Recent descoveries in Egypt, Safari Travel, Scuba Diving, Senior Citizens, Shore Excursions, Sightseeing Tours, Special Offers in Egypt | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The face of Tutankhamun

Every time I go to the Egyptian Museum with visitors or a film crew, I always love to take them up to the room of Tutankhamun’s treasures and show them the boy king’s golden mask. This beautiful treasure, which was unfortunately cut from the face of Tutankhamun with hot knives, is one of the most beautiful and stirring images of ancient Egypt. I have worked so much with Tutankhamun and his family over the past several years and we continue to look for the tomb of his wife, Ankhesenamun, in the Valley of the Kings. In addition to the search for her tomb, we are working on a full-scale, exact replica of Tutankhamun’s tomb, which will hopefully be installed soon next to Howard Carter‘s rest house in Luxor. Tut’s replica tomb will be the first in a new “replica valley” that will include the tombs of Seti I and Nefertari, which have long been closed off to the public.

King Tut Mask in the Egyptinan Museum

King Tut Mask in the Egyptinan Museum

The Deminsion of the Golden Mask of king Tut is 54 cm Height and 39.3 cm Width. The death mask of King Tut is a magnificent sight, gleaming with hammered gold and semi-precious stones. King Tut was buried in three golden coffins, two wooden ones with gold overlay and the third of gold. The well-known artifact, the golden mask, covered the head of the mummy on the third and most elaborate coffin.

Memphis Tours Egypt Since 1955
Reference:drhawass.com
Posted and edited by: Shaimaa Ahmed

Categories: Accessible Tours, Adventure Tours, Ancient Egypt, Archaeology, Budget Tours, Cairo history, Cairo Info, Cairo Sirport, Cairo Tour, Classical Tours, Combo Tours, Cultural Tourism, Dahabiyas in Egypt Nile, Discoveries in Egypt, Egypt Hotels, Egypt Latest news, Egypt onboard, Egypt Travel, Events In Egypt, Family Tours, Golf Tours, Honeymooners, International affairs, Internternational Museums, Latest Discoveries in Egypt, Latest new in Egypt, Luxury Holidays (VIP), Museums, Nile Cruise, Peru back it's antiquities, Recent descoveries in Egypt, Safari Travel, Scuba Diving, Senior Citizens, Shore Excursions, Sightseeing Tours, Special Offers in Egypt, Surfing Holiday | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Peru succeeds in getting 4,000 objects back home!

Between 1911 and 1915, Hiram Bingham III conducted excavations at Machu Picchu in Peru in conjunction with Yale University. Over the course of Bingham’s work, he uncovered more than 4,000 objects, which he requested to take back to Yale for study and temporary exhibition. In the original contract Bingham agreed to give back the objects after 18 months. However, the agreement was never honored and the artifacts have remained in the Peabody Museum at Yale ever since.

The site of Machu Picchu in Peru from which the 4,000 objects were excavated by Hiram Bingham. The site will celebrate its centennial of discovery in 2011. (Photo: Peruvian Government)

The site of Machu Picchu in Peru from which the 4,000 objects were excavated by Hiram Bingham. The site will celebrate its centennial of discovery in 2011. (Photo: Peruvian Government)

Both Peru and Yale University have been in negotiations over the past few years to return the objects back to their rightful home in Peru. Due to Yale’s resistance however, Peru filed a lawsuit against Yale citing their violation of Peruvian law by removing the objects without special permission from the Peruvian government and their refusal to give the objects back. Unfortunately, after the lawsuit and the ensuing legal red tape, no agreement had been reached between the two parties as of 2010.

In April 2010, the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA) sponsored a conference on the International Cooperation for the Protection and Repatriation of Cultural Heritage. The main goal of the conference was to bring together nations who had been negatively affected by illegal trafficking of antiquities so that they could work together to find a solution to this problem. A total of twenty-two countries attended the conference, including a delegation from Peru. I was very impressed with Peru’s commitment to the repatriation of stolen artifacts and by their impassioned participation in the conference. All the delegations were asked to submit “wish lists” at the conference so that there would be a public record of all the pieces those countries wanted returned to their rightful homes. Included on Peru’s wish list were the 4,000 objects at Yale.

After the conference I stayed in close contact with the Peruvian delegation and in October 2010, the Minister of Foreign Affairs from Peru, José Antonio Garciá Belaúnde, and the Ambassador of Peru in Egypt came to meet me in order to seek my advice on what Peru should do in order to bring their precious objects home. I advised the Minister of Foreign Affairs to bring this matter to the media’s attention. One of the key components in my campaign to return stolen artifacts to Egypt is the media. I have been insistent on bringing this unacceptable behavior to light through press releases, print media and television appearances.

Taking this under consideration, Peru began an aggressive media campaign in November 2010 in order to pressure Yale into returning the Peruvian artifacts. Thankfully their efforts were successful and Peru and Yale University reached an agreement on November 23 for all of the 4,000 objects to be returned over the next two years. Most importantly the best quality pieces among the collection will be back in Peru for the centennial celebration of the discovery of Machu Picchu. I am extremely pleased at the outcome of this case and I hope that Peru’s battle will become one of many success stories in the return of stolen antiquities. I am very glad that I could be of assistance in their negotiations with Yale and I look forward to seeing more artifacts returned to their rightful home.

Memphis Tours Egypt Since 1955
Reference: drhawass.com
Posted by: Shaimaa Ahmed

Categories: International affairs, Peru back it's antiquities | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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