The Incredible Phenomenon At Abu Simbel Sun Festival

For most of the year, the inner sanctuary of the main temple at Abu Simbel is shrouded in darkness.

Ramses II Temple at Abu Simbel, Egypt

Ramses II Temple at Abu Simbel, Egypt

On two days, traditionally the anniversary of the birthday and coronation of pharaoh Ramses II, a shaft of sunlight pierces the gloom, illuminating statues of gods and the king in the temple’s inner sanctum.

The Festival:

The Abu Simbel Sun Festival at Aswan, Egypt is observed twice every year on 22nd Of February and on 22nd of October, the dates that mark the emperor’s birthday and his ascension to the throne. On these days, shafts of sunlight enter into the temple and illuminate the statues of the great king Ramses II and the two sun

gods Re-Horakhte and Amen-Re seated beside the Theban god Ptah, the god of darkness.

As the temple remains in absolute darkness through out the year and receives sunlight on these two very special days, the rare phenomenon is a scene that you just cannot afford to miss. Celebrated in a big way by the locals, undoubtedly the Sun Festival at Abu Simbel is one of the most uncommon and astounding festivals in the world.

To be a part of Egypt’s Abu Simbel Sun Festival, reach the temple way before dawn, as it is packed with crowd and watch the spectacular event occur before your eyes. You may al

so join in the celebrations of dance, music, food and fun later in the day to have a wholesome experience at the Abu Simbel Sun Festival in Egypt.

The specialty of the Abu Simbel Temple:

An architectural wonder, the Abu Simbel temple was built by the Egyptian emperor Ramses II back in 1250 BC along the banks of the mighty river, Nile in the southern part of Egypt. Known for his genius concepts in architecture and a passion for erecting monuments and structures commemorating his victories in the battles fought, the Pharaoh built the Abu Simbel temple near the Nubia borders in Upper Egypt, during his rule from 1270 to 1213.

As the temple was meant to be dedicated to the two Egyptian sun gods, Re-Horakhte and Amen-Re; the entire building was carved out of a single sandstone in a way that the sunrays could enter the inner-most sanctum of the temple and illuminate the seated statues of king Ramses II and the two sun gods, only on two significant days of the year.

Posted By: Mai Mohamed

Memphis Tours Egypt Travel Agency

Advertisements
Categories: Ancient Egypt, Budget Tours, Classical Tours, Cultural Tourism, Events In Egypt, Family Tours, Honeymooners, Luxury Holidays (VIP), Nile Cruise, Sightseeing Tours | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Post navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: